You can’t make people pay taxes in your Province – You need to persuade them

I’m forever struck by the stupidity and irrationality of politicians.  Consider today’s example, François Legault, leader of Québec’s Coalition Avenir Québec (CAQ), commenting on the decision of Canadian tennis star Eugénie Bouchard to become a resident of the Bahamas:

 “I think we should live where we were born, where we learned to play tennis and pay taxes in our country.”

Continue reading “You can’t make people pay taxes in your Province – You need to persuade them”

Coporate Income Tax, Dutch Disease, and Left-Wing Economic Incoherence

I was thinking some more about NDP tax policy the other night and I was struck by the dichotomy between left-wing thinking on tax and monetary policy and their implications for corporations.

The NDP and its fellow-travelers have, for years now, been lamenting the strength of Canada’s dollar, suggesting that it has hollowed out the Canadian manufacturing sector, undermining jobs.  Whether it’s NDP Leader Thomas Mulclair complaining about “Dutch Disease” or labour economists Erin Weir  or Andrew Jackson proposing ways to control the Canadian dollar, the economic brain-trust on the left seem to agree that a rising dollar is bad for both Canadian corporations in the manufacturing sector and, ultimately (though perhaps foremost) their workers.

Continue reading “Coporate Income Tax, Dutch Disease, and Left-Wing Economic Incoherence”

If the NDP Wants to Start a Conversation About Taxes, Here’s Where they Should Start

It’s been a slow month, so I’ve been following the low profile policy bun-fight that’s broken out in NDP ranks in reaction to Thomas Mulclair’s commitment that, if elected, the NDP won’t raise taxes (other than the corporate income tax, which I’ll come back to).  Dawn Black, over at ipolitics.ca (in an otherwise strange article trying to link the Harper Conservatives with the lunatic “freeman” movement of tax protestors) goes to the crux of the matter, surely the NDP believes that taxes fund social programs that Canadians that  make Canada a better country, in which case “[t]ax hikes are a reasonable option that reasonable people can discuss“. By avoiding that discussion (or at least, sharply circumscribing it), Mulclair and the NDP are ceding the tax policy space to the Tories. Continue reading “If the NDP Wants to Start a Conversation About Taxes, Here’s Where they Should Start”